The Misplay Meta
Week of 2/11/21

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders. We share that data every Friday in this article series.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

407 games tracked

Mono F 11.5%
Creation Sentinels 11.3%
Tradition Soldiers 9.8%
Vision Control 6.6%
Mono P 5.9%
Instinct Sling 5.2%
Xenan Mid 4.9%
Hooru Soldiers 4.4%
Knowledge Control 4.2%
Xenan Mandrakes 3.7%
Ambition Valks 3.4%

Throne

182 games tracked

Stonescar Mid 7.7%
Xenan Mid 7.1%
Even Xenan 6.6%
Xenan Reanimator 5.5%
Praxis Tokens 4.9%
Skycrag Sling 4.4%
Skycrag Yetis 4.4%
Skycrag Jarrall 3.8%
Feln Mid 3.3%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.

Breaking Up with Amplify Combo

Well, look who wandered in… Hello and welcome to The Misplay! This is the next installment of the article series that accompanies act two of the podcast.

On our last show, we took an in-depth look at what makes Expedition Amplify combo tick. We laid out how the combo works, where the windows for meaningful interaction are, and ways to attack the deck. We used pensfan62’s decklist for reference. Wsg_Auto brought a take on Amplify combo to the most recent Expedition to Tuesday Night Eternal.

In the spirit of 16-bit off-brand Mortal Kombat, let’s get into combo breaking.

Putting the Pieces Together

At its core, the Amplify combo is a game-winning sequence that revolves around Overloader, cheap Amplify cards, and Pyrotech Explosion. Cards that have cheap amplify costs of 1 power or less allow Overloader to generate power. Hardiness and Diabolic Machinations are the most likely cards you’ll see in this role, but Celebration or Martial Efficiency can provide some redundancy. The deck plays Overloader, then Amplify spells to generate a ton of power, and pays 18 or more power to fire off a Pyrotech Explosion for lethal damage.

With a basic understanding of how the combo works, let’s dive into the finer details of how and when the combo comes together. Remember, 18 power is the threshold to make Pyrotech Explosion deal lethal damage to an opponent with their starting 25 health (it deals 32 damage). In a broad sense, there are two ways to start the combo turn: the safe way and the more explosive way.

The safe way allows you to generate enough power to send a game-winning Pyrotech Explosion even if an opponent removes your Overloader in response to your Amplify spell. The most simple set up is playing an Overloader on turn 7 with a Diabolic Machinations for at least 9 health. The 9-health minimum generates the magic 18 power necessary for a lethal Explosion. One of the nice things about the safe way is that the Machinations is highly favored to find the Pyrotech Explosion if you don’t have it, and just wins the game if you happen to already have it in hand (even if the Machinations is negated).

The explosive way lets you go off a couple turns sooner, but requires more pieces in hand in order to work. It’s possible to combo off on turn 5. If your opponent used all of their power and you’ve sculpted a perfect hand, grab that Overloader with Condemn at the end of their turn 4 and get ready for some fireworks. This combo sequence plays Overloader into Hardiness amplified three times. Overloader generates 6 power and fuels the Diabolic Machinations for a minimum of 9 health. Overloader works its magic and makes the 18+ power to turbo out a lethal Pyrotech Explosion.

If you have this draw every time you’ll be well on your way to that million damage achievement. Just watch out for that player on the other side of the screen — their job is making the game as difficult as possible for you.

Throwing a Monkey Wrench into the Works

Dismantling Amplify combo is a little different than playing against other unit-based combo decks. The mechanism of the Overloader engine works even if Overloader dies in response to the first Amplify spell. That interaction is key to understanding when and how to disrupt the combo. I propose a handful of ways to attack the deck: find a way to kill their Overloader, attack their hand and market access, negate a key spell, or just race them.

If you get the chance to remove Overloader outside of the combo turn or discard it from your opponent’s hand, the game is basically over. Cards like Exploit nab that pesky grenadin from the opponent’s hand. Playing a removal spell on the Overloader in play is possible, but a more difficult prospect. Send an Agent won’t to save you from a Diabolic Machinations for 9+ health. However if your opponent tries for the turn 5 win, that same Send an Agent will save you if you respond to the Hardiness, since that gives them 6 power but they won’t be able to generate more with their Machinations.

If your opponent doesn’t give you a window to remove Overloader, disrupting their hand is another angle to attack the combo. There aren’t a ton of options in Expedition, but Exploit is the probably the best hand disruption spell we’ve had in the history of Eternal. Unless you are lucky enough to nab the Overloader you are disrupting their game plan and buying time, so it’s really important to back up the disruption with pressure. Given enough time the deck will assemble the combo and find ways to beat interaction. For my money, I like to target the deck’s Market access. There are playsets of Condemn and Ixtun Merchant. If you take a Condemn and it forces them to get an Overloader on their turn with a Merchant, that opens up a wider window to send an Overloader straight to the void.

If you favor playing Primal over Shadow, there are still ways to pick the combo apart. *So far, we’ve looked very closely at the role Overloader plays in making the combo tick, but while Overloader is the linchpin, the deck uses a spell-based combo. Spells can typically be fought with face Aegis and negate effects.

Unfortunately, Pyrotech Explosion ignores face Aegis, which leaves negate effects as the primary way for Primal strategies to break up the combo. The spells that matter the most are Diabolic Machinations and Pyrotech Explosion. You’ll have to weigh the options of which one you want to target in each game.

Diabolic Machinations is a good target to negate when you are confident that your opponent doesn’t already have a Pyrotech Explosion in hand. If they goes all-in on their Machinations and you negate it, you leave them hanging onto their health by a thread, facing whatever board presence you have. It should be easy pickings to close the game from there. The danger of this line is that the opponent generated a ton of power. They may have other ways to find the Explosion or, in the absolute worst case, they already have it in hand and you negated the wrong spell.

Pyrotech Explosion is generally a good target to negate since it’s the card that actually deals lethal damage. You may leave your opponent in a state of having used up all of their resources. Hopefully you negate the Explosion, remove the Overloader, and run the opponent over. The danger of trying to negate the Explosion is that your opponent has seen an absurd number of cards if they resolved a Diabolic Machinations, or they have generated a ton of power with multiple other cheap Amplify spells. Then you have to contend with the possibility of your opponent holding their own negate effects, or having redundant copies of Explosion.

Don’t worry if you aren’t playing Shadow or Primal, there’s still hope. When all else fails or you don’t have access to disruption, you can always just race them. If your plan is to just deal lethal before your opponent assembles their combo, just remember the magic numbers.

Their turn 5 combo is risky, because you may remove Overloader and strand a Diabolic Machinations in their hand. If you pressure them into trying to go off early and save a fast spell to kill Overloader, you’ll have no problem closing out the game in short order.

The other magic number is the minimum 9 health the opponent needs to pay when they have 7 power to combo off in one turn. The combo uses health to generate power and dig for combo. The less health an opponent has, the less meaningful resources Diabolic Machinations provides. If something goes a little wrong and you need a Hail Mary, you can try holding up something like Char or a spicier option like Turn Down.

I hope this breakdown of Amplify combo was helpful. I highly recommend playing the deck. I don’t think it’s a meta-defining deck, it’s just very different from how we usually play Eternal and is very fun to play. In general Dire Wolf Digital has done a good job allowing combo decks to exist but not be wildly oppressive to the meta.

Just in case you need a third, highly medium opinion, here is my version of the deck. I hope you have a blast!

The Misplay Meta
Week of 2/4/21

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders. We share that data every Friday in this article series.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

274 games tracked

Hooru Soldiers 19.7%
Xenan Mid 7.3%
Vision Control 6.9%
Mono F 6.6%
Instinct Sling 6.2%
Praxis Sentinels 4.7%
Mono P 4.4%
Ambition Valks 3.6%
Elysian Jarrall 3.3%
Rakano Valks 3.3%

Throne

324 games tracked

Xenan Reanimator 9.6%
Hooru Kira 8.6%
Skycrag Yetis 6.8%
Xenan Mid 6.5%
Stonescar Mid 5.2%
Feln Mill 4.6%
Feln Mid 4.0%
Skycrag Aggro 4.0%
Mono F 3.4%
Mono S 3.4%
Vision Control 3.1%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.

The Misplay Meta
Week of 1/28/21

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders. We share that data every Friday in this article series.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

336 games tracked

Hooru Soldiers 13.7%
Praxis Sentinels 8.0%
Ambition Valks 6.5%
Mono F 6.3%
Vision Control 6.3%
Instinct Sling 5.7%
Xenan Mid 5.7%
Xenan Mandrakes 4.8%
Elysian Jarrall 3.9%
Knowledge Control 3.6%

Throne

242 games tracked

Xenan Reanimator 12.4%
Skycrag Aggro 8.7%
Skycrag Yetis 7.4%
Xenan Mid 6.6%
Hooru Kira 5.4%
Vision Control 3.7%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.

Studying the Tape

Well, look who wandered in… Hello and welcome to The Misplay! This is the next installment of the article series that accompanies act two of the podcast.

On our last show, we discussed how to use spectating to get better at Eternal. We covered the different ways you can spectate and what kinds of questions to ask – or things to look for – when you spectate. Keep in mind that this type of spectating is more akin to studying than it is to zoning out and watching TV. Today I will recap that discussion and share a few games that are worth going back and studying from this past competitive season.

Ways to Spectate

On the show, we talked about three ways to watch people playing Eternal: watching a friend in-client, watching a stream on Twitch, and watching a YouTube video or Twitch VOD. Each method of watching provides a different perspective, with its own set of pros and cons.

Streaming

The advantage of watching a streamer is that you get their perspective of the game they are playing in the moment. You can see the way they develop their game plan over the course of the game through their narration. Chat is another perspective to take in, though be wary of the legendary “chat lethal.”

Tournaments

Watching a tournament broadcast gives you a different perspective to follow. Instead of hearing the thoughts directly from the featured players, you get the commentary team’s thoughts about the game. Watching commentary is an excellent model of how to discuss game decisions with a partner. In some cases, you get the bonus perk of seeing players’ hands due to the magic of production. There’s a slight downside to seeing both hands. It can trick you into making assumptions about plays that a player who couldn’t see both hands might make. It’s easy to play around that one-of Backlash when you know the opponent is holding it. If you can’t catch a tournament live, the VOD archives are a goldmine of matches to watch at your leisure.

Replays

Watching a replay comes with its own perks. The big upside is being able to pause and rewind while mulling over a turn or sequence. Having a little bit of extra time really enables a deeper level of reflection than watching games live affords. Replays also give spectators the most flexibility when setting aside the time to study the tapes. Conversely, spectating and discussing lines with friends takes the most upfront coordination, but – in my opinion – is the most interesting, helpful, and fun way to watch.

Spectating

Spectating and talking games through with friends was the last way we discussed to watch Eternal. In my opinion, it’s the most fun in that it’s like doing your homework with your friends. You can capitalize on the in-client chat or a voice chat app to talk about plays in real time. The only real downside is that your discussion of a specific turn is only as long as the turn timer allows. The game won’t pause while you and your buddies LOUDLY discuss what to do with that combat trick. Be nice, be kind, and try to keep playing at a reasonable pace.

It’s All About Asking ‘Why?’

When the stars align and you find some friends to dive into the spectating wurm-hole with you, the most important question to be asking constantly is ‘why’.

Pick a line any line, why’d you do it?

Gato Sujo:

On the play, I just played an on-curve Jennev Merchant against Xenan Reanimator. I’m thinking about either grabbing the Royal Decree or Honor of Claws. My hand is a little light on action. I think it’s better to take the Honor of Claws and craft a way to win in the early part of the late game before they go off or start playing Azindels.

Find out what a friend would do and why they would go that route

Robot Mark:

I would take Royal Decree and hope to snipe Katra. Your plan doesn’t work if they ramp to 6 or 7 going into turn five. If you miss on Katra maybe you hit one of their haymaker units. That buys you enough time to find a way to win the game through their stronger late game.

Compare the plans and make a decision

Xenan Reanimator has a way stronger late game than my deck so we agree that we need to find a way to win sooner rather than later. Royal Decree is a tool that fights combo strategies and decks that are all-in on a small subset of cards. The cost on Royal Decree is that it’s tempo-negative and might mess up my curve on turn four. I don’t think that Xenan Reanimator is so all-in on one card that it folds to Royal Decree the way that Feln Reanimator or Amplify combo do. It might be a good enough speed bump if I hit Katra or Icaria. It is likely that you get the onslaught trigger from this position so it is a safe play to make. It is not always guaranteed depending on how hard the person plays around Royal Decree.

Honor of Claws is also tempo-negative, but it puts me up on cards instead of down a card. The big upside is that it might let me sculpt a game plan that wins the game, since my hand is light on impactful action. It looks like I’m not in a very good position in this game and so I probably need a series of fortunate draws to win here. Honor of Claws gives me the best chance to hit enough impactful draws to hopefully find a way to steal the game.

When you go through this process make sure to try to talk about the merits of the plays. Be open minded to your buddy’s perspective. As imsobad told me on stream this weekend, “It isn’t about who is right or wrong more of the time. It’s about finding the plays and making the decisions that give you the best chance to win the game.” You can take this kind of discussion to the video room or work with friends in-game and in Discord for further practice.

Practice Time

Here are three high stakes and interesting games played by some of Eternal’s top players:

As you watch the games, make sure to play along as the game progresses. I recommend watching the game on mute. Try to avoid looking at the opponent’s hand. You can refer back to it later. When you get to a moment where you would do something different than the on-camera pilot, pause the video. Think about why you wanted to make your play. Then try to come up with the reason the pilot made the decision they did. Then go back and rewatch the turn or sequence with the audio. It will give the commentator’s perspective on the second round. Compare your rationale to the commentator’s. If learning this way works well for you, there’s a ton of archived footage on Twitch to assess and study.

Thanks for stopping by. If you haven’t already done so, I would encourage you to check out the podcast episode featuring imsobad. He’s entertaining and the discussion about spectating on the show will have some different details and key points to take away. Happy spectating and hopefully time in the tape room helps you on the battlefield.

The Misplay Meta
Week of 1/21/21

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. This is a new article series we will publish every Friday.

Like many of you, we were huge fans of Team Rankstar’s Meta Monday articles. Their weekly series not only reported on the meta, but also helped shape it. We thank Team Rankstar and their many contributors for their time and dedication to the Eternal community. We hope to continue that tradition by sharing our own data.

As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

287 games tracked

Instinct Sling 11.8%
Ambition Valks 8.4%
Hooru Soldiers 8.0%
Vision Control 5.6%
Knowledge Control 5.2%
Elysian Jarrall 4.9%
Mono F 4.9%
Xenan Mandrakes 4.5%
Vision Mid 4.2%
Tradition Soldiers 3.1%

Throne

318 games tracked

Skycrag Aggro 8.5%
Xenan Reanimator 7.5%
Skycrag Yetis 6.9%
Hooru Kira 6.3%
Xenan Mid 6.0%
Vision Control 5.7%
Stonescar Mid 3.8%
Feln Mill 3.1%
Skycrag Sling 3.1%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.

The Misplay Meta
Week of 1/14/21

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. This is a new article series we will publish every Friday.

Like many of you, we were huge fans of Team Rankstar’s Meta Monday articles. Their weekly series not only reported on the meta, but also helped shape it. We thank Team Rankstar and their many contributors for their time and dedication to the Eternal community. We hope to continue that tradition by sharing our own data.

As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

264 games tracked

ambition valks 17.0%
vision control 10.6%
instinct sling 9.1%
mono f 6.4%
xenan mandrakes 5.3%
elysian jarrall 4.5%
knowledge mandrakes 4.5%
xenan mid 4.5%
knowledge control 4.2%
rakano valks 4.2%
skycrag jarrall 3.4%
combrei control 3.0%

Throne

324 games tracked

vision control 8.3%
xenan reanimator 7.7%
skycrag aggro 5.9%
skycrag yetis 5.2%
even xenan 4.6%
xenan mid 4.6%
skycrag throne room 3.7%
hooru kira 3.4%
elysian jarrall 3.1%
skycrag sling 3.1%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.

Molto Vivace

Well, look who wandered in… Hello and welcome to The Misplay! This the start of a new article series that will accompany act two of the podcast.

This year we plan to expand our website content and to supplement the podcast. On the show we try to entertain, and provide food for thought about learning and improving at Eternal. This series will usually be an introduction to those topics and skills.

On our last show, we discussed tempo in Eternal. We talked about what tempo is, why it’s important in Eternal, and how to apply its components to your games. Tempo can be broken down into a handful of components—board presence, power efficiency and advantage, and low-cost interaction—that create an advantage in the early game and convert that advantage into a win.

Establish a strong or dominant board presence

It’s easy to envision what a dominant board state looks like in a game of Eternal: when my opponent goes off with Xenan Reanimator and brings back two Icaria, The First Reapers, removing my only unit, I’m running for the concede button.

When trying to maximize advantage through tempo, the key is to establish a strong board presence in the early game. I want units that can win the game on their own, are resilient to opposing interaction, and have good stats for their cost. Kira, Ascending and Jarrall, Ascending are the stars burning brightest in the current Throne and Expedition metas with these characteristics. At their six-influence thresholds they have incredible stats for their costs. A 4/3 and a 3/5 for two power are wildly powerful. They also have powerful battle skills and may draw more cards, which allows them to continue attacking or find critical pieces of interaction to protect the threats on board.

Now, a heads-up reader might point out that both of these units just die to Annihilate. I concede that’s true. However, if you support these units with cheap interaction after putting your opponent on the back foot, it’s possible to make them miserable trying to make their Annihilates stick.

Low-cost interaction

Low-cost interaction is another pillar of tempo oriented strategies. If dominant early-game units are peanut butter, the cheap interactive spells that support and protect them are the jelly. Low-cost interaction plays a variety of roles. The three most common are:

  • removing an opposing threat
  • protecting a deck’s MVP units
  • disrupting the opponent’s game plan

Removal is a staple in most decks, except maybe the most extreme all-in combo decks. When a deck relies on creating and maintaining a tempo advantage, cheap and flexible interaction are at a premium. Brutally efficient answers are what tempo-oriented strategies need to maintain their advantage. Permafrost, Torch, and Open Contract are some premier options in Throne. They have some limitations, but for the units these cards are meant to answer there’s almost nothing more efficient.

Other forms of interaction are dedicated to protecting an all-star unit. Thinking back to Kira and Jarrall, they each come with some BFFs that really pack a punch. Between playsets of Bubble Shield and Silverblade Intrusion, for the low cost of one power you can usually protect Kira from just about any single piece of removal. Jarrall players have to be a little more creative, but it turns out that Pause for Reflection is an efficient way to save Jarrall from removal spells and Killer attacks alike.

The last common role of interaction is disrupting the opponent’s game plan. There is some overlap between protecting your units and disrupting an opponent. Negating your opponent’s spells, attacking their hand, and playing specific pieces of hate all fall into this category. Pursuing a tempo-oriented game plan prioritizes board position over just about everything else. Cards like Exploit or Adjudicator’s Gavel are not the type of interaction that it wants. Spells like Dazzle and units like Svetya, Lightbringer are good examples that disrupt an opposing deck’s game plan and still impact the board.

There haven’t been any earth-shaking revelations so far: cheap, powerful threats are great. Low-cost, flexible interaction is great. The payoff comes from answering why those cards are great.

Power advantage

A deck gains tempo or power advantage by making more efficient plays than the opposing deck.

When I try to Hailstorm away my opponent’s Kira, Ascending and Hojan, Crownbreaker, Hailstorm is my plan to catch up after not having developed my board in the early turns of the game. If my opponent plays Silverblade Intrusion to save both units, something has gone terribly wrong for me. I used my entire turn to play Hailstorm. Silverblade Intrusion preserved their board presence, while I have done nothing and lost a card. My opponent extracted a huge power advantage by beating my 3-cost hailstorm with their 1-cost interactive spell. When I pass the turn I fall even further behind. My opponent got an insane tempo advantage that I am unlikely to recover from.

Another way to convert power advantage into big tempo gains is by using efficient cards to make multiple impactful plays to the board earlier and more often than decks with slower curves or powerbases. Imagine an Elysian Jarrall player setting up a turn 4 where they play a Jarrall with four primal influence, then pass holding up two power. Their opponent plays a Vara, Vengeance Seeker and passes back, when the Elysian player Equivocates the Vara. Both players used four power, but the Elysian player made two board-impacting plays while their opponent only made one. The Elysian player successfully leveraged their power advantage into a huge tempo swing in their favor.

Hopefully this introduction to tempo helps you use tempo to your advantage in your games. If you are looking for a deck to practice these concepts with, I recommend Doc28’s Krull Kira as piloted by 3eowulf in the most recent Tuesday Night Eternal tournament or Doc28’s Krull Elysian.

The Misplay Meta
Week of 1/7/21

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. This is a new article series we will publish every Friday.

Like many of you, we were huge fans of Team Rankstar’s Meta Monday articles. Their weekly series not only reported on the meta, but also helped shape it. We thank Team Rankstar and their many contributors for their time and dedication to the Eternal community. We hope to continue that tradition by sharing our own data.

As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

221 games tracked

ambition valks 12.7%
elysian jarrall 12.7%
vision control 8.1%
xenan mandrakes 8.1%
combrei control 6.3%
praxis sentinels 4.5%
knowledge mandrakes 4.1%
skycrag jarrall 3.6%
argenport mid 3.2%
mono f 3.2%

Throne

377 games tracked

skycrag yetis 10.9%
xenan reanimator 10.6%
hooru kira 9.5%
elysian jarrall 4.5%
vision control 4.5%
stonescar mid 3.7%
argenport mid 3.4%
combrei control 3.4%
rakano valks 3.4%
stonescar aggro 3.4%
honor control 3.2%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.

The Misplay Meta
Week of 12/31/20

Welcome to The Misplay Meta. This is a new article series we will publish every Friday.

Like many of you, we were huge fans of Team Rankstar’s Meta Monday articles. Their weekly series not only reported on the meta, but also helped shape it. We thank Team Rankstar and their many contributors for their time and dedication to the Eternal community. We hope to continue that tradition by sharing our own data.

As part of our internal tracking, The Misplay collects data on what we see while playing the ranked ladders.

This is not a tier list. Think of it more as frequency. We’re sharing the archetypes we see and providing links to similar deck lists from Eternal Warcry. For clarity, we limit our charts to the most-seen decks, then we combine and list the remaining decks as “Other”. The frequency limit may fluctuate from week to week based on the number of games we record, but rest assured that we are trying to present the data as accurately as possible.

This report uses our team’s naming conventions: [Faction] [Defining Characteristic]. There are other naming conventions in the Eternal community, but we hope this version will be clear, consistent, and supportive of a wide range of players, from the least fluent to the unnecessarily fluent in Eternal jargon.

Expedition

335 games tracked

ambition valks 15.5%
xenan mandrakes 11.0%
combrei control 9.9%
argenport mid 5.7%
elysian jarrall 4.5%
vision (tjs) control 4.5%

Throne

364 games tracked

xenan reanimator 11.0%
skycrag yetis 10.4%
skycrag aggro 8.5%
skycrag throne room 6.9%
stonescar mid 5.8%
hooru kira 4.9%
argenport mid 4.1%
even xenan 3.6%
rakano valks 3.6%

Thank you to the entire Misplay team for their time, effort, and dedication to this project.